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Infectious Disease / Microbiology

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M1 Infections Disease Microbiology

Image adapted from the National Cancer Institute. This image is in the Public Domain.

Term: Winter 2009
Published: May 28, 2010
Revised: August 7, 2014

This sequence introduces students to medical microbiology, infectious diseases, and antimicrobial therapy, and focuses on pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of various infectious diseases.

Sequence Directors:
Carol Kauffman, M.D.
Donna Shewach, Ph.D.
Michael Imperiale, Ph.D.

dScribe: Cathy Mummert

 

Syllabus

Overview

The Microbiology/Infectious Diseases Sequence is a five week block of lectures, small group exercises, and individual assignments that comes near the end of the first year of medical school. It is a combined effort of faculty from the Divisions of Infectious Diseases in the Departments of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, and the Department of Pharmacology. The Sequence will introduce students to medical microbiology, infectious diseases, and antimicrobial therapy, and will focus on pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of various infectious diseases.

Sequence Goals

  1. To gain an understanding of the roles the normal flora play in maintaining homeostasis and pathogenic microorganisms play in causing disease.
  2. To gain knowledge about the various types of microorganisms and how they are differentiated from each other.
  3. To understand the pathogenesis of the most important infectious diseases in humans.
  4. To gain an understanding of the symptoms and signs which are commonly seen when infection occurs in different organs.
  5. To learn basic concepts regarding the approach to the diagnosis of infectious diseases.
  6. To learn the approach to establishing the cause of an outbreak.
  7. To understand the basis for the actions of the antimicrobial agents that are used to treat infections and the measures that are used to prevent infections.

Teaching Methods

The initial lectures will focus on basic microbiological principles and will be followed by a series of lectures on specific pathogens, clinical manifestations of infections caused by these pathogens, and antimicrobial therapy of infections caused by these pathogens. Following the series of lectures each day, Small Group Sessions will discuss various aspects of the preceding lectures in more depth or will explore related topics.

The Small Group Sessions are an integral and vitally important part of the sequence. They will consist of discussion of clinical cases and hands-on lab work. Each group will be led by one basic science faculty member and one clinical faculty member who will facilitate the discussion and the lab work. This setting provides a unique forum for discussion of the particular topic at hand.

The Small Group Sessions will begin immediately after the lectures have ended. The exact time will vary slightly every day, depending on the amount of material covered in the lectures.

Attendance at and participation in the Small Group Sessions is mandatory and is required to pass the course. If some urgent matter or illness precludes attendance at a Small Group Session, the Small Group Leader and your Class Counselor must be notified as soon as possible.

Textbooks

The text for the course is Engleberg, Dermody, and DiRita (eds), Schaecter’s Mechanisms of Microbial Disease, Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins, April 2006. The newest edition of Goodman & Gilman, The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, is the suggested pharmacology textbook. Reading about the topic before class will help you to better understand the material presented.

Computer Programs

Three computer programs dealing with immunizations, diagnostic testing, and parasitology are required course work. The Immunization Program will not only allow you to learn vaccines, in general, but will also allow you to gain knowledge about your own personal immunization profile. This program will need to be done throughout the entire five-week sequence. These programs can be accessed through the M1 portal site.

Examinations and Grading Policies

At the end of each week, a quiz will be given covering all the material from that week. There will be a comprehensive final at the end of the course. The material from week 5 will receive extra emphasis on the final examination. All tests will be available on Friday afternoon and must be finished by Monday morning. All questions will be multiple choice, true/false, or matching. Questions on each test will be drawn from lectures, small group exercises, reading assignments, multi-disciplinary conferences, and the computer programs. Examples are attached. Each weekly test will count for approximately 30-40 points, and the final examination for approximately 100 points. The weekly tests will be 1 hour long and the final examination will be 3 hours long. In addition, 40 points will be given for active participation in the small group exercises. Points will be lost for failure to come to the small group or to participate actively. A cumulative score of 75% must be reached to achieve a grade of Pass; grades are recorded as Pass/Fail.

We sincerely hope that this Sequence will be enjoyable and instructive. We urge you to talk with your Small Group Leaders as well as any of the Sequence Coordinators should any problems arise or whenever you have questions. We are here to help convey to you the sense of satisfaction that can arise from learning about infectious diseases and their management. Most importantly, we are here to help prepare you for your role on the clinical rotations and ultimately in the practice of medicine.

Sequence Instructors

Sequence Coordinators

Michael J. Imperiale, PhD
Department of Microbiology/Immunology

Carol A. Kauffman, MD
Division of Infectious Diseases
Department of Internal Medicine

Donna S. Shewach, PhD
Department of Pharmacology

Additional Faculty

Janet R. Gilsdorf, MD
Division of Infectious Diseases
Department of Pediatrics

Michele Swanson, PhD
Department of Microbiology/Immunology

Harry L. Mobley, PhD
Chairman, Department of Microbiology/Immunology

David Miller, MD, PhD
Division of Infectious Diseases
Department of Internal Medicine
Department of Microbiology/Immunology

Learning Outcomes

1. To gain an understanding of the roles the normal flora play in maintaining homeostasis and pathogenic microorganisms play in causing disease.
2. To gain knowledge about the various types of microorganisms and how they are differentiated from each other.
3. To understand the pathogenesis of the most important infectious diseases in humans.
4. To gain an understanding of the symptoms and signs which are commonly seen when infection occurs in different organs.
5. To learn basic concepts regarding the approach to the diagnosis of infectious diseases.
6. To learn the approach to establishing the cause of an outbreak.
7. To understand the basis for the actions of the antimicrobial agents that are used to treat infections and the measures that are used to prevent infections.
 

Reading List

The text for the course is Engleberg, Dermody, and DiRita (eds), Schaecter’s Mechanisms of Microbial Disease, Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins, April 2006.

The newest edition of Goodman & Gilman, The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, is the suggested pharmacology textbook.

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
This Work, Infectious Disease / Microbiology, by The Regents of The University of Michigan is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license.